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How I Became An Oxfordian

“How I Became an Oxfordian” is a periodic series of essays from members about the origins of their interest in the Shakespeare Authorship question. Every Oxfordian has his or her own story about the events that led to that moment of recognition when it became clear that Oxford had to be the real Shakespeare. Every Oxfordian’s story is unique and an inspiration to other Oxfordians and to people new to the authorship question. Bob Meyers, President Emeritus of the National Press Foundation, is editor of this series and wants to hear from you about how you became an Oxfordian. SOF members, send your essay (500 words or less in an editable form such as a Word document), along with a digital photo of yourself to info@shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org.

Elke Brackmann: How I Became an Oxfordian

Obediently and happily I followed the pattern of understanding the Bard’s life at my University of Innsbruck in the seventies. Absorbing everything that led to a more profound understanding of his works, I was mildly disappointed to learn all about ...

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William Ray: How I Became an Oxfordian

In the October 1991 issue of The Atlantic was an exchange between Tom Bethell and Irvin Matus about the author of the Shakespeare works. I read those pages with interest. Neither was a scholar. Strangely, there were no professors engaged ...

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Julie Bianchi: How I Became an Oxfordian

When I was a teenager growing up in Northern California at the dawning of the Age of Aquarius, Shakespeare was Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey in velvet clothing stroking each other and panting poetic dialogue in amber-tinged moonlight. The author ...

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John Varady: How I Became an Oxfordian

Soon after reading Julius Caesar in Junior High school I became a ‘Bardolator.’ Later, while taking Latin, I immersed myself in the history of late Republican Rome. Shakespeare’s knowledge of the period amazed me, especially when I learned how little ...

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Theresa Lauricella: How I Became an Oxfordian

When I was ten, my father purchased a set of classics bound in rich green leather with gold leaf edges. The volumes included works by Voltaire, Cervantes, Twain, and many others. Shakespeare’s works, in four volumes, were included too. As ...

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Mark Alexander: How I Became an Oxfordian

I read Charlton Ogburn’s The Mysterious William Shakespeare as a graduate student in English. I recall that as I read, the coincidences between the plays and the Earl of Oxford’s life piled up, especially in Hamlet. I was still skeptical, ...

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Ann Zakelj: How I Became an Oxfordian

I love a mystery. Maybe it was all those Nancy Drew books that I read as a kid. My penchant for all things mysterious evolved into the exploration of more than one (dare I say?) conspiracy theory. The Romanovs, JFK’s ...

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Gary Livacari: How I Became an Oxfordian

I am greatly indebted to the late Joseph Sobran for introducing me to the Shakespeare-authorship question. It was his columns in National Review almost 30 years ago that first alerted me to the controversy. Every so often, he would stray ...

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Catherine Hatinguais: How I Became an Oxfordian

While growing up in France in the sixties and seventies, I was not aware that there was an authorship controversy. As a teenager I attended a performance of Richard III at Stratford-upon-Avon and later at University I read some of ...

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David Van Vleck: How I Became an Oxfordian

I’m a playwright/novelist/screenwriter (whose favorite actor is, coincidentally to Oxfordiania, Sir Derek Jacobi). Several years ago, I was at my grandparents’ summer farm in Vermont, and relaxing on our porch, I found myself in conversation with my (now-ex; met another ...

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