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How I Became An Oxfordian

“How I Became an Oxfordian” is a periodic series of essays from members about the origins of their interest in the Shakespeare Authorship question. Every Oxfordian has his or her own story about the events that led to that moment of recognition when it became clear that Oxford had to be the real Shakespeare. Every Oxfordian’s story is unique and an inspiration to other Oxfordians and to people new to the authorship question. Bob Meyers, President Emeritus of the National Press Foundation, is editor of this series and wants to hear from you about how you became an Oxfordian. SOF members, send your essay (500 words or less in an editable form such as a Word document), along with a digital photo of yourself to info@shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org.

John Gerhard Shuck: How I Became an Oxfordian

I have been convinced Shaksper did not write Shakespeare since I came across Dorothy and Charlton Ogburn Jr.’s book Shake-speare, the Man Behind the Name over three decades ago. The first thing I noticed was, of course, the signatures. The ...

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Piet-Hein Zijl: How I Became an Oxfordian

My name is Piet-Hein Zijl, living in Zaanstad, a town just north of Amsterdam, Holland. My age is 69, I worked as a teacher and artist (made pen drawings, etchings), am a reader of poetry in public and as a ...

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Robin Phillips: How I Became an Oxfordian

My fascination with Oxford/Shakespeare was a coup de foudre, a sudden jolt. My first brush with Shakespeare came years ago, when as a young woman I was studying acting in London, with tutors from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts ...

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Allan Shickman: How I Became an Oxfordian

I read my first Shakespeare play when I was fourteen.  In those days, Julius Caesar was a high-school freshman’s first exposure to the great playwright.  At that age, youngsters are universally looking for someone to copy.  Should I adopt Beethoven’s frown, my ...

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Elisabeth Waugaman: How I Became an Oxfordian

My first exposure to Shakespeare occurred at our children’s library in a dark paneled room with leaded-glass windows. Searching through the shelves, a book caught my eye. Flipping through it, I discovered the most beautiful illustrations of a magical world. ...

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“Mr. W.H.” Identified in W. Ron Hess

Our October 25 installment of “How I Became an Oxfordian” featured a contest in which readers were invited to guess the true identity of a modern-day Oxfordian telling his story under the name, “Mr. W.H.” We invited readers to guess ...

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Thomas Drelon: How I Became an Oxfordian

I heard of the Authorship Question in 1999-2000 reading a small brochure bought at the Globe, with the seductive portrait of Edward de Vere painted in Paris in 1575. The same day, I remember having seen Mark Rylance himself, rehearsing ...

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John Shahan: How I Became an Oxfordian Activist

It’s rare for a high school English teacher to mention that there is any doubt about the identity of William Shakespeare, but I was fortunate to have one who did inform her students about it. I didn’t think much about ...

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“Mr. W.H.”: How I Became an Oxfordian

He’s back, and we’ve got him!  Yes, the famous Mr. W.H., he of onlie begetter fame, has generously and pseudonymously offered up this essay, telling us how he became an Oxfordian. But wait! There’s more! Correctly identify the contemporary Mr. ...

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Diane Elliott: How I Became an Oxfordian

Why does authorship matter? Well, why does truth matter? It matters because story is tied to truth by a thousand fine threads, adding complexity and resonance. The Shaksper biography was dead on arrival for me, no resonance with the works, ...

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