Home / Tag Archives: Richard Waugaman

Tag Archives: Richard Waugaman

Branding the Author: Feigned Authorship Neutrality and the Folger Folio Tour

Shelly Maycock Originally published in Brief Chronicles First Folio Special Issue (2016), pages 5–30 “Thence comes it that my name receives a brand.”1 “It’s not enough to speak, but to speak true.”2 Select Folger Shakespeare Library First Folios (1623) are ...

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“Mr. W.H.” Identified in W. Ron Hess

Our October 25 installment of “How I Became an Oxfordian” featured a contest in which readers were invited to guess the true identity of a modern-day Oxfordian telling his story under the name, “Mr. W.H.” We invited readers to guess ...

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Editorial: Midnight in the Garden of the SAQ

By Dr. Michael Egan Readers will know that Shakespeare Beyond Doubt contributor, Hardy Cook, also runs SHAKSPER, an online discussion group. Recently the issue of free debate surfaced as a topic, and its moderator, a retired professor, stoutly defended his ...

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Waugaman and Stritmatter confer with Global Hamlet co-founder Nefeli Misuraca in DC

  Oxfordian researcher Richard Waugaman, MD, and Brief Chronicles general editor Roger Stritmatter, PhD, met recently with The Global Hamlet co-founder Nefeli Misuraca, PhD, at the Cosmos Club in Washington, DC to discuss the first crowd-sourced edition of a Shakespeare play. Lisa McAlister of ...

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Brief Chronicles III released online

Shakespeare Fellowship President Earl Showerman announced the publication of the fellowship’s online journal Brief Chronicles, Vol. 3: Brief Chronicles Vol 3 has been posted on-line. This year’s volume has over 300 pages of outstanding scholarship, including articles on Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, ...

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Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: Stephanie Hughes Reviews “The Bisexuality of Shake-speare’s Sonnets and Implications for de Vere’s Authorship” by Dr. Richard M. Waugaman

When we add to the evidence in the Sonnets all the gender-bending in the plays, the passionate “male bonding” in Coriolanus, and the obvious homosexual love of the Antonios in Twelfth Night and Merchant of Venice, it would seem that at the very least, homosexual desire was something the author understood.

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