Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org Research and Discussion of the Shakespeare Authorship Question Fri, 21 Aug 2015 18:34:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Summer 2015 newsletter published http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/summer-2015-newsletter-published/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/summer-2015-newsletter-published/#comments Thu, 20 Aug 2015 02:28:04 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6679

Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship Newsletter editor Alex McNeil has released the Summer 2015 edition of the newsletter, now available online — under password — to SOF members. Non-members may gain access to the newsletter by joining the SOF. Sign up to become a member from our Join the SOF page.  

The summer-edition, cover story, “An Hour with Wells and Edmondson,” is an interview of Stanley Wells and Paul Edmondson by SOF trustee Don Rubin and his wife, poet Patricia Keeney.

SOF Trustee Don Rubin interviewed Wells and Edmondson in 2014.

SOF Trustee Don Rubin interviewed Wells and Edmondson in 2014.

The interview took place in Stratford, Ontario when Wells and Edmondson spoke there last year. This interview, along with a foreword by editor McNeil, is provided to all of our readers at “An Hour with Wells and Edmondson.”

In his foreword, McNeil said:

A couple of things caught my attention. First is Wells’s statement (made before the interview, and brought up in Rubin and Keeney’s first question) that he didn’t intend to read Mark Anderson’s Shakespeare By Another Name until it had been ‘categorically proven’ that the Stratford man was not the author of the Shakespeare canon. That reminded me of something I’d read years ago in a biography of Galileo. Turning his telescope to the night skies, Galileo was the first to see the moons of Jupiter, objects which obviously revolved around something other than Earth. When he invited a professor of mathematics at the local university to look through the telescope, the professor declined the offer because he knew that there was nothing to see.

In addition to SOF news, news notes, and book reviews, this summer issue features an article titled, “Is Ben Jonson’s De Shakespeare Nostrati a Depiction of Edward de Vere?” by Andrew Crider, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Williams College. Crider said:

Ben Jonson’s De Shakespeare Nostrati is usually regarded as a brief remembrance of William Shakspere of Stratford. Yet the person described by Jonson corresponds poorly with what we know from other sources of the life and character of the Stratford man. On the other hand, Jonson’s character sketch is fully consistent with the colorful biography of Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford. Jonson described Shakespeare as an open and creative individual whose writing and whose conduct suffered from a lack of self-discipline. We have no evidence that either openness or poor self-discipline characterized Mr. Shakspere, but both qualities are major themes in de Vere’s biography.

Notes, reviews, and more

A news note, titled “An article in a recent issue of Shakespeare Quarterly Sheds Light on Odd Word in Loves Labours Lost,” is a fascinating report on work by Ross Duffin, author of the award-winning Shakespeare’s Songbook published in 2004. The note begins:

An article in a recent issue of Shakespeare Quarterly was picked up by many media outlets, including Live Science.com and several newspapers. In the SQ note, Ross Duffin, Professor of Music at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, makes a solid case that a one-word line uttered by Moth at the beginning of act 3 of Loves Labours Lost—“Concolinel”—is a mistranscription of the title of a then-popular bawdy French song, “Qvand Colinet.”

Reviews include:

An article about estate planning titled, “Making a Planned Gift to the SOF: Taking a First Step” is condensed on our Ways to Give page.

Editor McNeil said:

In each issue I try to include a good mix of articles — up to 3000 words or so— book reviews, news notes, and official announcements from the SOF. Three-thousand words is not necessarily the maximum length for an article; sometimes we’ve run an article in two parts in consecutive issues. I’ve been fortunate to have a surplus of good articles for each issue of the newsletter, which means that some items have to be cut. So for those who may have submitted something quite a while ago, that doesn’t mean I won’t get to your article!

Keep up to date using the SOF website

SOF president Tom Regnier reported that changes have been made to the conference agenda since the newsletter went to press. For an up-to-date agenda, check the “2015 Ashland Conference Agenda” page on this website. Regnier said, “Conference attendees will receive a printed program with the latest schedule when they arrive at the conference.”

Subscribe to SOF online news

Since the publication of the summer newsletter, changes have been made to the process for subscribing to SOF news via email. To assure your continued access to SOF news, please subscribe, or resubscribe, using the new two-step process described below:

1. Go to the SOF home page. Under “Subscribe” in the right-hand column, fill in your name and email address, and click “Sign up.”

2. You will immediately receive an email from SOF asking you to confirm your subscription. Open the email, and click “Yes, subscribe me to this list.”

That’s all. Once you’ve signed up, we at the SOF will alert you to important news and information about our publications, conferences, and activities. You can stop receiving email at any time by clicking “Unsubscribe” in any SOF email message.
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Regnier, Joyrich and Warren nominated to SOF board; Kositsky retires http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/regnier-joyrich-and-warren-nominated-to-sof-board-kositsky-retires/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/regnier-joyrich-and-warren-nominated-to-sof-board-kositsky-retires/#comments Thu, 13 Aug 2015 22:49:48 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6669 Reported by the SOF Nominations Committee chaired by Bonner Miller Cutting and published in Summer 2015 SOF Newsletter edited by Alex McNeil

The Nominations Committee of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship has nominated the following persons for office:

For a one-year term as President, and for a three-year term on the Board of Trustees: Thomas Regnier, JD, LLM.

For three-year terms on the Board of Trustees:  Richard Joyrich, MD, and James Warren.

Tom.Regnier.headshot.

Thomas Regnier, JD, LLM

Thomas Regnier, JD, LLM, currently serves as president of the SOF, and is nominated for a second one-year term as president and for a three-year term as a trustee. He is a practicing attorney in the Miami, Florida, area. He received his juris doctor, summa cum laude, from the University of Miami School of Law, and his master of laws from Columbia Law School, where he was a Harlan F. Stone Scholar. He has taught at the University of Miami School of Law (including a course on Shakespeare and the Law) and at Chicago’s John Marshall Law School. Tom has frequently spoken at authorship conferences on aspects of law in Shakespeare’s works, and he wrote the chapter on Shakespeare’s legal knowledge in Shakespeare Beyond Doubt? In June 2014, Tom delivered a presentation at the Cosmos Club in Washington, D.C., entitled, Hamlet and the Law of Homicide: the Life of the Mind in Law and Art.”

joyrich

Richard Joyrich, MD

Richard Joyrich, MD is a current trustee, and is being nominated for another term. He has been practicing radiology (specifically nuclear medicine) for over twenty-five years in Detroit. He has been a regular attendee at the Stratford Festival in Ontario as well as the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and other theatrical venues and has “completed the canon” (seen all of the recognized plays of Shakespeare) at least three times. He was a contributor to the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition’s Exposing an Industry in Denial campaign and has also contributed to the Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter. He has served on the boards of trustees of the SOS and SOF since 2006 and is a past president of the Shakespeare Oxford Society.

warren

James Warren

James Warren has not previously served as a trustee. He was a Foreign Service officer with the U.S. Department of State for more than twenty years, during which he served in public diplomacy positions at American embassies in eight countries, mostly in Asia. He later served as executive director of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST) and then as regional director for Southeast Asia for the Institute of International Education (IIE). He is the editor of An Index to Oxfordian Publications, and has given presentations at several Oxfordian conferences.

No nominations were received by petition. Thus, under the SOF bylaws, no ballots will be sent to members, and the three persons nominated by the Nominations Committee will be deemed elected to their respective offices upon approval of motions to that effect made at the Annual Meeting of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship in Ashland, Oregon, on Saturday, September 26, 2015.

The members of the 2015 Nominations Committee were Bonner Miller Cutting (chair), Cheryl Eagan-Donovan, and John Hamill.

Kositsky to retire from SOF board

Lynne Kositsky

Lynne Kositsky

Lynne Kositsky is leaving the SOF board of trustees this year after completing her term. A longtime trustee and former president of the Shakespeare Fellowship, Lynne was instrumental in laying the groundwork for the merger of the Shakespeare Fellowship and the Shakespeare Oxford Society, which was effected in late 2013. The Board of Trustees is deeply grateful for her many years of service.

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British scholars speak Sept. 23, 2015 in Ashland, OR http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/british-scholars-speak-sept-23-2015-in-ashland-or/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/british-scholars-speak-sept-23-2015-in-ashland-or/#comments Fri, 07 Aug 2015 23:03:50 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6632 OLLI-Logo

Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship conference organizer Earl Showerman, MD, reports that Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) will sponsor a community lecture titled, “British Scholars Address the Shakespeare Authorship Challenge” from 1-3 p.m. September 23, 2015 at the First Presbyterian Church of Ashland, Oregon. The event is free, no tickets are necessary.

Showerman said the topic of discussion at the September 23 OLLI scholars forum will be, “How credible is the evidence that Will Shakspere of Stratford-on-Avon wrote the works attributed to ‘Shake-speare’?”

The British scholars are Ros Barber, PhD; Kevin Gilvary, PhD; Julia Cleave, MA (Oxon.); Alexander Waugh, and Margrethe Jolly, PhD — who will be in Ashland for the SOF annual conference September 24-27, 2015.

Those who attend the forum on September 23 will receive personal invitations to an invitation-only screening of Cheryl Eagan-Donovan’s Shakespeare-authorship documentary, Nothing Is Truer than Truth, to be viewed on the morning of Sept. 24, 2015 at the SOF Ashland conference.

Showerman is a published researcher on the authorship question, specializing in Greek references in the plays. He has taught the Shakespeare authorship question in OLLI classes affiliated with the Southern Oregon University Division of Continuing Education in Ashland for five years.

Showerman said the topic of discussion at the September 23 OLLI scholars forum will be, “How credible is the evidence that Will Shakspere of Stratford-on-Avon wrote the works attributed to ‘Shake-speare’?”

Earl Showerman provided the following information about the distinguished speakers:

  • Ros Barber, PhD, is an English Lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London, and author of the award-winning verse novel, The Marlowe Papers (2012) and Shakespeare: The Evidence (2013). She is also editor of 30-Second Shakespeare (2015). Her most recent publications included two articles in the current Notes & Queries. She is Director of Research and Webmaster of the Shakespearean Authorship Trust (London).  
  • Kevin Gilvary, PhD, obtained MA’s in Classics and Applied Linguistics from the University of Southampton, and was recently awarded his doctorate at Brunel University, London, England with a thesis on “Shakespearean Biografiction,” detailing how biographers rely on context, conjecture and inference to construct a life of the Bard. Kevin is the principal contributor and editor of Dating Shakespeare’s Plays (2010), for which he was named Oxfordian of the Year in 2011. He is also the current Chair of the De Vere Society.
  • Julia Cleave, MA (Oxon.), is a Trustee of the Shakespearean Authorship Trust and a member of the academic board of the Temenos Academy. She taught Shakespeare in the context of training courses for foreign teachers and lecturers sponsored by the British Council. Since 1998 she has worked as an independent scholar, tracing the presence of Hermetic traditions in Renaissance and seventeenth century art and literature.   
  • Alexander Waugh is the author of Classical Music (1995), Opera (1996), Time (1999), and God (2002), as well as a family biography, Fathers and Sons (2004), and the House of Wittgenstein (2008). He is General Editor of the scholarly 42-Volume Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh for Oxford University Press, Senior Visiting Fellow at the University of Leicester, and co-editor of Shakespeare Beyond Doubt? Exposing an Industry in Denial (2013). He is Honorary President of the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition.
  • Margrethe Jolly, PhD, is a lecturer in English literature and language, who received her PhD from Brunel University in 2013. Her book, The First Two Quartos of Hamlet: A New View of the Origins and Relationship of the Texts (2014), argues that a close examination of Hamlet supports the earliest hypothesis that Q1 Hamlet was written first. For Hamlet this comparison indicates a playwright who pursued a deliberate and extensive process of revision, working from the source to Q1, and then to Q2. It suggests that Q1 may be an example of what some would see as the missing ‘juvenilia,’ and that the date for Hamlet needs reviewing.
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Controversy Films launches campaign to fund outreach for the documentary film Nothing is Truer than Truth http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/controversy-films-launches-campaign-to-fund-outreach/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/controversy-films-launches-campaign-to-fund-outreach/#comments Wed, 05 Aug 2015 13:30:34 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6613 By Cheryl Eagan-Donovan

As founder of Controversy Films and director of the documentary Nothing is Truer than Truth, I am very pleased to announce a new fundraising campaign to assist with post-production and outreach for the project.  The educational outreach program, Shakespeare for Bullies, includes an interactive website and curriculum that teachers can use to facilitate discussion of the film, Edward de Vere as the author of Shakespeare’s work, and discrimination based on gender identity and sexual preference. Learn more about the project and how to contribute here.

The fine cut version of the film recently screened at the Sheffield Documentary Festival Videotheque in the UK, where distributors from around the world come to view projects for acquisition. Still to be completed are the final music, graphics, color correction, online editing and audio mix, and funds raised through the online Kickstarter campaign, as well as those made to the project’s fiscal sponsor, IFP New York, will be used for these finishing costs as well as outreach.

Joining the Controversy Films team this year are two highly sought-after Los Angeles-based film professionals.  Zimo Huang is a very talented film editor based in West Hollywood, California. He recently edited the 2015 Academy Award nominated documentary feature “Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me.” His credits also include “Dominion,” featuring John Malkovich and Rhys Ifans, “Buffalo Girls,” and “Another Love.”

Zimo was born and raised in Beijing, China. He moved to the States when he was 15 and went to high school in Texas, college in New England, then finally came to Los Angeles to start his creative life. Taking advantage of having lived in both China and the States, Zimo’s creative process is a mixture of traditional Eastern culture and modern Western style. In his spare time, he enjoys listening to Radiohead and playing Chopin and Mozart for friends and families.

Katy Jarzebowski is a film, concert, and multimedia composer whose music grows from a rich tradition of orchestral writing, her Eastern European roots, a fascination with combining old and new world styles, and most importantly, a lifelong romance with the cinema. Her work has been acknowledged by numerous institutions and collaborative opportunities. In 2014, she was chosen as a composer fellow for the Sundance Institute’s Music and Sound Design Lab at Skywalker Sound under the direction of Peter Golub and with such distinguished and inspiring advisors as Alan Silvestri, James Newton Howard, Harry Gregson-Williams, and Blake Neely.

Katy has studied music composition in Paris under Martin Matalon at IRCAM and researched the work of Nino Rota and Ennio Morricone in Italy at the NYU Florence campus.

There will be a private screening of the film at the 2015 Annual Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship Conference on Thursday, September 24th at the Ashland Springs Hotel in Ashland, Oregon.

The Kickstarter campaign runs through August 30, 2015 and the project must meet its goal and raise the entire amount by that date or it will receive no funds.

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Brief Chronicles VI available from Create Space http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/brief-chronicles-vi-available-from-create-space/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/brief-chronicles-vi-available-from-create-space/#comments Sat, 27 Jun 2015 18:31:15 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6443 Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship journal Brief Chronicles VI, available in hardcopy from Amazon.

Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship journal Brief Chronicles VI, available in hardcopy via CreateSpace at Amazon.

The Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship journal, Brief Chronicles VI, produced by general editor Roger Stritmatter, PhD, and managing editor Michael Delahoyde, PhD, is now available online to SOF members at Brief Chronicles VI under the Publications Tab on the SOF website.

This is the first edition released under the new SOF membership policy that provides members electronic access to SOF publications, but does not provide hard copy editions free of charge as in the past.

Hard copy issues will now be available to both membership and the general public at low cost through Amazon’s CreateSpace print-on-demand publishing arm at Amazon.com. A Kindle version is not currently anticipated by the SOF board.

SOF president Tom Regnier, JD, LLM, said that members were informed of the new publishing policy in the Fall 2014 edition of the SOF newsletter and directly by email. Regnier said:

We announced last year that the increased costs of printing and mailing the journals made us consider whether to cut back on the frequency of their publication. After hearing from our members, we decided to continue publishing both Brief Chronicles and The Oxfordian annually.

Although we could no longer afford to offer printed journals as a membership benefit, we decided that all members would have online access to the journals. Furthermore, those who desired print copies of the journals would be able to buy them as a separate purchase. 

Through CreateSpace, we are able to make printed copies of BC6 available to you from Amazon for only $12.99, plus shipping. At present, BC6 is available through Amazon.com (U.S.) and Amazon affiliates in the European Union. Our Canadian members may purchase through Amazon.com. BC6 will sell for £8.29 in British pounds and under €12.50 in Euros (prices vary slightly from country to country).

We think you will enjoy BC6 whether you prefer to read it digitally or in print form. We thank you for helping us bring the truth to light.

The SOF board of trustees hopes that news-page readers will support the work of research into the Shakespeare authorship by joining SOF now.

Inside Brief Chronicles VI

For a glimpse into the new edition of Brief Chronicles, see SOF trustee and University of York professor Don Rubin’s historical accounting of the press war incited by the 2013 authorship conference in Toronto. Rubin’s article,:“Sisyphus and the Globe: Turning (on) the Media” published in Brief Chronicles VI is available free to our readers. A video of Rubin’s presentation of this account given at the 2014 authorship conference in Madison WI will also be available on this site soon.

Professor Rubin’s study of Nestruck’s craven attempts to have him discredited serves as a fascinating case study into how a human might behave when he is hell-bent on keeping a raft afloat that is slowly and ingloriously submerging beneath the muddy waters of a rising tide.

Alexander Waugh, Introduction. Brief Chronicles VI

In his introduction to Brief Chronicles VI, Alexander Waugh referred to Rubin’s Toronto adventures:

Professor Don Rubin, who has achieved much success in inspiring students at the University of Toronto to take a keen interest in the Shakespeare authorship problem has, like most of us, made his fair share of enemies along the way. In this issue he tells of the hair-raising animosity levelled against his work by one James Kelly Nestruck, a theatre critic of Toronto’s Globe and Mail. Stratfordians enjoy speculating on the psychological aberrations that motivate those who question their orthodoxy — we are snobs, anarchists, neo-romantics, Shakespeare-haters, mentalists, holocaust deniers, supporters of South African apartheid, etc., etc., ad nauseam. Above all we are scary. Professor Stanley Wells, in a television interview with his colleague, Carol Rutter, announced, in quite hysterical tones, that it is “dangerous to encourage people to question history.” A petrified educationalist called Alasdair Brown, in internet discussion, similarly announced that the Oxfordian challenge to his creed was “insidious, reactionary and dangerous.” Professor Rubin’s study of Nestruck’s craven attempts to have him discredited serves as a fascinating case study into how a human might behave when he is hell-bent on keeping a raft afloat that is slowly and ingloriously submerging beneath the muddy waters of a rising tide.

Waugh’s full introduction of Brief Chronicles VI titled “From the Pulpit: A Few Home Truths — A British Introduction” may be read on this site. A full table of contents of Brief Chronicles VI includes:

  • “From the Pulpit: A Few Home Truths — A British Introduction” [to BC VI] by Alexander Waugh
  • “Sisyphus and the Globe: Turning (on) the Media” by Don Rubin
  • “Biography, Genius, and Inspiration” by Bernd Brackmann
  • “Strat Stats Fail to Prove that ‘Shakspere’ is Another Spelling of ‘Shakespeare’” by Richard F. Whalen
  • “Arms and Letters and the Name ‘William Shake-speare'” by Robert Detobel
  • “The Use of State Power To Hide Edward de Vere’s Authorship of the Works Attributed to ‘William Shake-speare’” by James Warren
  • “Chaucer Lost and Found in Shakespeare’s Histories” by Jacob Hughes
  • “A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Shakespeare’s Aristophanic Comedy” by Earl Showerman
  • Mark Twain and ‘Shake-Speare': Soul Mates”by James Norwood
  • “Ben Jonson and the Drummond ‘Informations': Why It Matters” by Richard Malim
  • “Was William Scott a Plagiarist? A Review of Scott’s The Model of Poesie” reviewed by Richard Waugaman
  • “Dr. Magri’s Bow and Quiver: Such Fruits Out of Italy: The Italian Renaissance in Shakespeare’s Plays and Poems” reviewed by William Ray
  • “Towards a Pragmatechnic Shakespeare Studies: A Review-Essay on U. Cambridge’s Shakespeare and the Digital World” reviewed by Michael Dudley

With the release of the latest edition of Brief Chronicles, the previous edition —Brief Chronicles V — has been removed from password protection and is now available to all readers on the SOF website under the publications tab.

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Mark Anderson will keynote Ashland conference http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/mark-anderson-will-keynote-ashland-conference/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/mark-anderson-will-keynote-ashland-conference/#comments Thu, 25 Jun 2015 02:41:42 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6461 Mark Anderson

Mark Anderson, author of Shakespeare
By Another Name, a biography of the 17th
Earl of Oxford, will be keynote speaker
at the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship
authorship conference September 24-27,
2015 in Ashland, OR.

Ashland authorship conference update
reported by Earl Showerman

For further information on lodgings or travel, or to register for the SOF conference and reserve group order theatre tickets, go to: 2015 Conference

The early response of both scholars and the membership to gather in Ashland, Oregon for the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship annual conference September 24-27, 2015 has been remarkable.  The program schedule includes over 25 presentations, featuring a number of scholars from Great Britain, and an exhibit of Renaissance folio editions from the special collection at the Hannon Library of Southern Oregon University. Full registration includes all plenary sessions, a printed syllabus, an opening reception, two buffet lunches, and the awards banquet at the conclusion of the program.

Group ticket sales to the three Shakespeare plays in production at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival have been robust, and as of June 21, the tickets reserved for the SOF group for Pericles have sold out. Theatre tickets to Much Ado about Nothing and Antony and Cleopatra are still available on a first-come, first-served basis.

For SOF conference registrants unable to purchase tickets to the OSF production of Pericles, a video of the 1984 BBC production will be screened at the Ashland Springs Ballroom on the same evening as the OSF production.

For further information on lodgings or travel, or to register for the SOF conference and reserve group order theatre tickets, go to 2015 Conference.

Program schedule for conference events in Ashland, OR:

Thursday, September 24, 2015
8:00 – 12:00 – Conference Registration Opens
9:00 – 12:00 – Exhibit of Folio Editions at Hannon Library of Southern Oregon University
10:00 – 12:00 – Screening of Nothing Is Truer than Truth at Ashland Springs Hotel Ballroom – Cheryl Eagan-Donovan
12:00 – 1:00 – Lunch (on own)
1:00 – 1:15 – Welcome, Introductions and Orientation
1:15 – 2:00 – Michael Morse: “Such virtue hath my pen”:  Onomastic Wit and Revelatory Wordplay in Shake-speare’s Sonnets
2:00 – 2:45 – Jan Scheffer: Oxford’s Capture by Pirates, April 1576
2:24 – 3:00 – Coffee/Tea Break
3:00 – 3:45 – Heward Wilkinson: Did We Mislay Hamlet’s ‘as ‘twere’ on the Way to the Authorship Amphitheatre?
3:45 – 4:30 – Don Rubin: Methinks the Man:  Peter Brook and the Authorship Question
4:30 – 5:00 – Alexander Waugh & Roger Stritmatter: A New Shakespeare Allusion Book
5:00 – 5:30 – Shakespeare Identified 100
5:30 – 7:30 – Opening Reception with No-Host Bar and Appetizers
8:00 – 10:40 – Much Ado about Nothing (Bowmer Theatre)

Friday,  September 25, 2015
8:00 – 8:30 – William J. Ray:  The Droeshout Etching as a Revolutionary Renaissance Work of Art
8:30 – 9:15 – Robert Prechter: Why Did Robert Greene Repent His Former Works?
9:15 – 10:00 – Margrethe Jolly: Romeo and the Grafter
10:00 – 10:10 – Michael Morse: eMERITAS
10:10 – 10:30 – Coffee/Tea Break
10:30 – 11:30 – OSF Actor Panel: Much Ado about Nothing
11:30 – 12:15 – Julia Cleave: Shakespeare and the Visual Arts: The Case of the Bassano Fresco
12:15 – 1:30 – Buffet Lunch
1:30 – 2:15 – Ros Barber: Shakespeare: The Evidence
2:15 – 3:00 – Alexander Waugh: ‘Vulgar Scandal’ mentioned in Shakespeare’s sonnets
3:00 – 3:15 – Coffee/Tea Break
3:15 – 4:15 – Michael Delahoyde: Antony & Cleopatra
4:15 – 5:00 – Richard Whalen: The Queen’s ‘Worm’ in Antony and Cleopatra
5:00 – 5:30 – Julia Cleave: Antony and Cleopatra as Chymical Theatre
5:30 – Adjourn
8:00 – 11:00 – Antony and Cleopatra (Allen Elizabethan Theatre)

Saturday, September 26, 2015
8:00 – 9:30 – Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship Annual Membership Meeting
9:30 – 10:15 – Mark Anderson: Shapiro Agonistes — Why James Shapiro’s claims of a Jacobean phase to Shakespeare’s career are wrong
10:15 – 10:30 – Coffee/Tea Break
10:30 – 11:30 OSF Actor Panel – Antony & Cleopatra
11:30 – 12:15 – Kevin Gilvary – Who Wrote Shakespeare’s First Biography?
12:15 – 1:30 – Buffet Lunch
1:30 – 2:15 – Katherine Chiljan – Origins of the Shakespeare Pen Name
2:15 – 3:00 – Roger Stritmatter The Theology of Pericles
3:00 – 3:15 – Coffee/Tea break
3:15 – 4:00 – Wally Hurst – Pericles, Prince of Tyre: Its Authorship, The Question of Collaboration, and its Place in the Shakespearean Canon
4:00 – 4:45 – Earl Showerman – Pericles: Shakespeare’s Early Tragi-Comedic Miracle Play
4:45 – 5:30 – Ren Draya: Shakespeare’s The Tempest:  Music, Structure, and Fantasy
5:30 – Adjourn
7:30 – 10:30 – Screening of BBC Pericles in Ashland Springs Ballroom
8:00 – 10:30 – Pericles, Prince of Tyre (Thomas Theatre)

Sunday, September 27, 2015
8:00– 8:45 – John Shahan: Shakespeare Authorship Coalition Update
8:45 – 9:30 – James Warren: Oxfordian Theory and Academia: Past, Future and Present
9:30 – 10:15 – Tom Regnier: The Law of Evidence and the Shakespeare Authorship Question
10:15 – 11:00 – Coffee/Tea Break
10:30 – 11:30 OSF Actor Panel – Pericles
11:30 – 12: 30 – Legitimizing the SAQ Panel: Tom Regnier, Wally Hurst, James Warren, and John Shahan
12:30 – 2:00 – SOF Awards Banquet – Keynote Speaker – Mark Anderson

Earl Showerman is chairperson of the 2015 SOF conference in Ashland, OR. Showerman, Richard Joyrich, John Hamill, Bonner Miller Cutting, Don Rubin, and Wally Hurst form the nucleus of the SOF annual conference committee.

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Royal Shakespeare Company Website Retracts False Claims About Authorship Doubters http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/royal-shakespeare-company-website-retracts-false-claims-about-authorship-doubters/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/royal-shakespeare-company-website-retracts-false-claims-about-authorship-doubters/#comments Mon, 01 Jun 2015 10:00:18 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6366 Prof. Stanley Wells of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

Prof. Stanley Wells of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

A few years ago, the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) posted on its website an article by Professor Stanley Wells of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust (SBT) that called disbelief about the Stratford man as the author of the works of Shakespeare a “psychological aberration” attributable to “snobbery . . . ignorance; poor sense of logic; refusal . . . to accept evidence; folly; the desire for publicity; and even . . . certifiable madness.”

Mark Rylance, 3-time Tony Winner

Mark Rylance, 3-time Tony Winner

 

At the persistent urging of John Shahan, Chairman of the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition (SAC), a group of authorship skeptics, the RSC has at last removed the offensive article from its website! The Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship notes that Mark Rylance, the multi-award winning Shakespearean actor, authorship doubter, and an honorary trustee of the SOF, also helped to persuade the RSC to withdraw the article.

Following are excerpts from the SAC’s update, issued on June 1, 2015, in which Mr. Shahan details the efforts that brought about this triumph for the principles of free and open inquiry.


 

Good news! In response to letters from SAC, the RSC has removed false claims about authorship doubters from its website.

Professor Stanley Wells’ article on the “Authorship Debate” taken down!

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon (SBT) has long promoted a false negative stereotype of authorship doubters, and nowhere more blatantly than in an article on its website by then-SBT chairman Stanley Wells on “Shakespeare’s Authorship,” which included the following statement:

“The phenomenon of disbelief in Shakespeare’s authorship is a psychological aberration of considerable interest. Endorsement of it in favour of aristocratic candidates may be ascribed to snobbery – reluctance to believe that works of genius could emanate from a man of relatively humble origin – an attitude that would not permit Marlowe to have written his own works, let alone Shakespeare’s. Other causes include ignorance; poor sense of logic; refusal, wilful or otherwise, to accept evidence; folly; the desire for publicity; and even (as in the sad case of Delia Bacon, who hoped to open Shakespeare’s grave in 1856) certifiable madness.”

The purpose of this and similar claims by Stratfordians is, of course,  to smear and intimidate doubters and thus stigmatize and suppress a legitimate issue. If the case for Mr. Shakspere were as solid as they claim, there would be no need for such tactics. Since it is not solid, it is easier for them to keep people from looking into the evidence than having to confront and deal with it.

It is ironic that an English professor who is so jealous of his exclusive authority to rule on all things Shakespearean would think he could get away with usurping the authority to diagnose behavioral, character and psychiatric disorders and then generalize from a few specious, or even non-existent, examples to an entire group of people, virtually none of whom fits his stereotype. Here he was encroaching on one of my areas of expertise, and I knew that, if challenged, he would be unable to back it up.

In April of 2010, I sent him the following letter:

________________________________________________________________________

Dear Professor Wells,

I am writing on behalf of the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition to challenge your claim on the SBT website … that the phenomenon of widespread doubt about William Shakespeare’s identity is “a psychological aberration of considerable interest,” attributable to a variety of causes, including “snobbery” based on class prejudice, or “even certifiable madness (as in the sad case of Delia Bacon . . .).” If these allegations are true, it should be possible for qualified experts in the disciplines of psychiatry, psychology and sociology to validate your claims with empirical evidence. I hereby challenge you to either obtain such expert validation, or stop making the claims. Specifically, I challenge you to either back up your claims on the SBT website with data worthy of the high scholarly standards you claim to represent, or remove them forthwith.

Any theory should be evaluated based on the best arguments of its strongest proponents. There will, of course, be some level of aberrant thinking and behavior in any population; but to prove your claims, not only must you show that the prevalence of these conditions and behaviors is much greater among authorship doubters than in the general population, or in a control group, such as orthodox Shakespeare scholars, but that they are pervasive.

The enclosed “Declaration of Reasonable Doubt” names twenty prominent past doubters, including Mark Twain, William and Henry James, Tyrone Guthrie and Sir John Gielgud. On what basis do you claim that their doubts were due entirely to the defects you allege? Over 1,700 people have signed the Declaration. Of these, over 300 are current or former college/ university faculty members. Some of them are much better qualified to diagnose psychological disorders than you are. On what basis do you claim that they are aberrant?

You appear to label as “psychologically aberrant” anyone who disagrees with your view. You seem to be exploiting prejudices against the mentally ill to discredit your opponents. The use of such tactics is morally reprehensible, and those who would resort to them are unworthy of being regarded as legitimate stewards of the legacy of William Shakespeare. If you continue to make such allegations, on your website or elsewhere, with no credible evidence to back them up, you should assume that the SAC will pursue this issue further.

Sincerely,

John M. Shahan, Chairman, SAC

_______________________________________________________________________

I received no reply. Wells never provided a shred of evidence to back up his claim, and 14 months later the article was taken down from the SBT website. Later I learned that it had been posted on the RSC website under the title “Authorship Debate.” It must have been very effective there, sending a clear message to both current and aspiring RSC actors to toe the party line.

Unfortunately for Wells, it also made it possible to appeal to a higher authority, unlike at the SBT. In June of 2014, I wrote a similar letter to the Prince of Wales in his capacity as president of the RSC. His assistant forwarded it to officials at the RSC, and in January of this year I sent a follow-up letter to RSC chairman Nigel Hugill renewing the request and calling attention to several other falsehoods in Wells’ article. After that, it still took an assist from Mark Rylance before it was finally taken down.

The entire sequence, including the three letters and Wells’ article, can be read on the SAC website at this link.

We thank the Prince of Wales, Nigel Hugill and Mark Rylance for their kind assistance.

— John Shahan, Chairman, SAC

 

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J. T. Looney Reading List compiled by James Warren http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/j-t-looney-reading-list-compiled-by-james-warren/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/j-t-looney-reading-list-compiled-by-james-warren/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 13:52:31 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6244 Excerpted from the recently released third edition of James Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications published in hardcopy by William Boyle’s Forever Press, which is available in paperback, and in an online, searchable database format at Boyle’s Shakespeare Online Authorship Resources (SOAR) catalog. The list is printed below in both chronological and alphabetical order.

PART VIII: JOHN THOMAS LOONEY READING LIST

  1. CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER

1920

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  London: Cecil

Palmer. PR2947 09 L6  (excerpts reprinted in SAR, Issue #22: 2-12, Christmas, 1969; SON.

Vol. 25/1: 9-10, Winter, 1989; SON, Vol. 30/1: 13, Winter 1994; BTC, Vol. 1: 218-38;

BTC, Vol. 7: 230-31; and in TOX, Vol. 16: 19-28, 2014)

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  New York:

Frederick A. Stokes Company.  PR2947 O9 L6 1920a

1920, March 4

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Yorkshire Evening Post.

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Hull Daily Mail.

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer.

1920, March 5

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer.

1920, April 5

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Aberdeen Journal.

1920, April 12

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Nottingham Evening Post.

1920                                           

Björkman, Edwin       “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified by J. Thomas Looney (1920),” The Bookman, Vol. 51.

1921                                                                                                                                                           

Looney, J. Thomas    The Poems of Edward De Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  London: Cecil Palmer.  PR2326 O8

1921, February 16

Author Not Listed      “Review of The Poems of Edward de Vere (1921), edited by J. Thomas Looney.

1922, February

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare – Lord Oxford or Lord Derby?,” National Review (London), p. 801-09.

1922, October

Looney, J. Thomas    “The Earl of Oxford as ‘Shakespeare:’ New Evidence,” The Golden Hind, Vol. 1/1. [an edited

excerpt was reprinted in OXV, p. 168-176.

1929, Feb.

Looney, J. Thomas    “Letter: death of George Greenwood,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 12, p. 16.

1933, May 12

Robinson, Joan V.     Shakespeare and Mr. Looney, Cambridge Review, No. 54, p. 14-16. (reprinted in DVN, Vol. 15/1:

14-16, March 2008)

1935, April

Looney, J. Thomas    “Jonson v. Jonson (Part 1),” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 86, p. 64.

1935, May

Looney, J. Thomas    “Jonson v. Jonson (Part 2),” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 87, p. 80.

1935, Aug.

Looney, J. Thomas    “A More Important Christopher Sly,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 90, p. 120.

1935, Nov.

Looney, J. Thomas    “Lord Oxford and the Shrew Plays, Part 1,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 93, p. 176.

(reprinted in BTC, Vol. 2: 17-19)

1935, Dec.

Looney, J. Thomas    “Lord Oxford and the Shrew Plays, Part 2,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 94, p. 190-91.

1939, December

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American),

Vol. 1/1, p. 8. (reprinted in BTC, Vol. 2: 20-24)

1940, Dec.

Looney, J. Thomas    “Author of “Shakespeare” Identified Comments on Professor Campbell’s article “Shakespeare

Himself,” in Harpers (July 1940, p. 172-85),” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter

(American), Vol. 2/1, p. 1-3.

1941, Feb.

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare: A Missing Author, Part 1,” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American),

Vol. 2/2, p. 13-17.  (reprinted in BTC, Vol. 2: 135-44)  (excerpt reprinted in SON, “Vol. 13/1:

1-6, Spring, 1977; and in BTC, Vol. 6: 112-18) (another excerpt reprinted in SON, Vol. 24/4:

1-7, Summer, 1988)

1941, April

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare: A Missing Author, Part 2,” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American), Vol.

2/3, p. 18-30.  (repr. in BTC, Vol. 2: 144-55)

1944, April

Editors (SFQ)             “Discoverer of the True Shakespeare Passes: John Thomas Looney, 1870-1944,” Shakespeare

                                                     Fellowship Quarterly, Vol. V/2, p. 17-23. [includes letters from Looney to Eva Turner Clark

(10 Aug.1928), Carolyn Wells (6 Dec. 1932), Charles Wisner Barrell (6 June 1937 and 15

May 1942) and Will D. Howe (2 June 1938)] (reprinted in BTC, Vol. 3: 26-36)

1944, May

Allen, Percy                “John Thomas Looney (1870-1944),” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (English), p. 2-4.                SE   Page 2-4

1945

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified (1920).  New Yorker.

1949

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  Introduction by

William McFee; Afterword by Charles Wisner Barrell.  New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce.

PR2947 O9 L6 1949

1950, April 8                    

Basso, Hamilton         “The Big Who-Done-It,” review of “Shakespeare” Identified by J. Thomas Looney, 1949 edition,

New Yorker, p. 113-14. 117-18.

1962, Autumn

Demant, V. A.             “Obituary of John Thomas Looney (1870-1944),” Shakespearean Authorship Review, No. 8, p. 8-

  1. (reprinted in SON, Vol. 46/1, p. 21, May, 2010; and in BTC, Vol. 1: 214-217, and in BTC,

Vol. 5: 92-94).

1969, Christmas

Author Not Listed      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Shakespearean Authorship Review, Issue #22, p. 1.

1970, June 30

Horne, Jr., Richard    J. Thomas Looney’s Anniversaries, Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol. 6/2, p. 4.

1975

Looney, J. Thomas    “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and The Poems of

                                                     Edward de Vere.  3rd edition.  Ruth Loyd Miller, editor.  Two volume set.  Oxfordian

                                                     vistas is the title of the second volume.  Port Washington, NY: Kennikat

Press for Minos Pub. Co.  PR2947 O9 L6 1975

1976, Spring

Cyr, Gordon C.           “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified and The Poems of Edward de Vere, by J. Thomas Looney,

3rd revised edition edited by Ruth Loyd Miller (1975),” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol.

12/1, p. 5-6.

1979

Wainewright, Ruth    “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified and The Poems of Edward de Vere, by J. Thomas Looney,

3rd revised edition edited by Ruth Loyd Miller (1975),” The Bard, Vol. 2/2, p. 75-79.

1992, Winter

Goff, Tom                   “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified and The Poems of Edward de Vere, by J. Thomas Looney,

3rd revised edition edited by Ruth Loyd Miller (1975),” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol.

28/1, p. 10-11.

2000, Spring      

Campbell, Susan        “The Last Known Letter of Edward de Vere Brought to Light,” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter,

Vol. 36/1: 4-6

2007, Summer

Paul, Christopher       “A New Letter by J. T. Looney Brought to Light,” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol. 43/3, p.

8-9.

2008, June

Paul, Christopher       “Letter to the Editor: re Joan Robinson’s correspondence with and article on J. Thomas

Looney,” De Vere Society Newsletter, Vol. 15/2, p. 31-32.

2010

Lagwitz, U.;                               John Thomas Looney und Sigmund Freud (includes article by Richard M. Waugaman,

Hanno Wember;         “Psychoanalyse und die Verfasserschaftsfrage”)

Robert Detobel

(editors)

2014

Egan, Michael            “J. Thomas Looney Discovers Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford,” in The Oxfordian,

Vol. 16: 29-30.

 

*   *   *   *   *

 

  1. ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY AUTHOR NAME

 

Allen, Percy

1944, May           “John Thomas Looney (1870-1944),” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (English), p. 2-4.                                                                                                             SE       Page 2-4

Author Not Known

1945                     “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” New Yorker.

Author Not Listed

1920, March 4      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Yorkshire Evening Post.

1920, March 4      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Hull Daily Mail.

1920, March 4      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer.

1920, March 5      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer.

1920, April 5        “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Aberdeen Journal.

1920, April 12      “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Nottingham Evening Post.

1921, Feb. 16                “Review of The Poems of Edward de Vere (1921), edited by J. Thomas Looney.

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer.

1939, Dec.             “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American), Vol. 1/1, p. 8.

1945                               “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified (1920).  New Yorker.

1969, Christmas   “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified,” Shakespearean Authorship Review, Issue #22, p. 1.

Barrell, Charles W.

1949      Afterword to “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford by J. Thomas Looney.  New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce.  PR2947 O9 L6 1949

Basso, Hamilton

1950, April 8              “The Big Who-Done-It,” review of “Shakespeare” Identified by J. Thomas Looney, 1949 edition, New Yorker, p. 113-14. 117-18.

Björkman, Edwin

1920                     “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified by J. Thomas Looney (1920),” The Bookman, Vol. 51.

Campbell, Susan      

2000, Spring               “The Last Known Letter of Edward de Vere Brought to Light,” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol.

36/1, p. 4-6.

Cyr, Gordon C.

1976, Spring               “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified and The Poems of Edward de Vere, by J. Thomas Looney, 3rd rev. ed. edited by Ruth Loyd. Miller (1975),” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol. 12/1, p. 5-6.

Demant, V. A.    

1962, Autumn     “Obituary of John Thomas Looney (1870-1944),” Shakespearean Authorship Review, No. 8, p. 8-9.  (repr. in SON, Vol. 46/1, p. 21, May, 2010; in BTC, Vol. 1: 214-217, and in BTC, Vol. 5: 92-94).

Douglas, Lt. Col. Montagu W.                                                                                                             

1952                     Lord Oxford and the Shakespeare Group: a summary of evidence presented by J. T. Looney. G. H. Randall and Gilbert Slater.  Preface by Canon Gerald H. Rendall.  [Reprint of The Earl of Oxford as “Shakespeare”with new title.]  Oxford: Alden Press.  PR2947 O9 D62 1952 (Preface reprinted in BTC, Vol. 4: 223-224)

Editor (SFQ)     

1944, April          “Discoverer of the True Shakespeare Passes: John Thomas Looney, 1870-1944,” Shakespeare

                                             Fellowship Quarterly, Vol. V, No. 2, p. 17-23. [includes letters from Looney to Eva Turner Clark

(10 Aug.1928), Carolyn Wells (6 Dec. 1932), Charles Wisner Barrell (6 June 1937 and 15

May 1942) and Will D. Howe (2 June 1938)] (reprinted in BTC, Vol. 3: 26-36)

Egan, Michael

2014                     “J. Thomas Looney Discovers Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford,” in The Oxfordian, Vol. 16: 29-30.

Goff, Tom

1992, Winter              “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified and The Poems of Edward de Vere, by J. Thomas Looney, 3rd rev. ed. edited by Ruth Loyd Miller (1975),” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol. 28/1, p. 10-11.

Horne, Jr., Richard C.

1970, June 30     “J. Thomas Looney’s Anniversaries,” in Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol. 6/2: 4.

Lagwitz, U., Hanno Wember, and Robert Detobel (editors)

2010                     John Thomas Looney und Sigmund Freud (includes article by Richard M. Waugaman, “Psychoanalyse

und die Verfasserschaftsfrage”)

Looney, J. Thomas  

1920                     “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  London: Cecil Palmer.

PR2947 09 L6  (excerpts reprinted in SAR, Issue #22: 2-12, Christmas, 1969; SON. Vol. 25/1: 9-10, Winter, 1989; SON, Vol. 30/1: 13, Winter 1994; BTC, Vol. 1: 218-38; BTC, Vol. 7: 230-31; and in TOX, Vol. 16: 31-45)

1920                     “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company.  PR2947 O9 L6 1920a

1921                     The Poems of Edward De Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  London: Cecil Palmer.  PR2326 O8 1921

1922, Feb.            “Shakespeare – Lord Oxford or Lord Derby?,” National Review (London), p. 801-09.

1922, Oct.            “The Earl of Oxford as Shakespeare: new evidence,” The Golden Hind, Vol. 1/1.

1929, Feb.            “Letter: death of George Greenwood,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 12, p. 16.

1935, April          “Jonson v. Jonson (Part 1),” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 86, p. 64.

1935, May           “Jonson v. Jonson (Part 2),” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 87, p. 80.

1935, Aug.           “A More Important Christopher Sly,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 90, p. 120.

1935, Nov.           “Lord Oxford and the Shrew Plays, Part 1,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 93, p. 176.

(reprinted in BTC, Vol. 2: 17-19)

1935, Dec.           “Lord Oxford and the Shrew Plays, Part 2,” Shakespeare Pictorial, No. 94, p. 190-91.

(reprinted in BTC, Vol. 2: 20-24)

1940, Dec.           “Author of “Shakespeare” Identified Comments on Professor Campbell’s article “Shakespeare Himself,” in Harpers (July 1940, p. 172-85),” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American), Vol. 2/1, p. 1-3.

1941, Feb.            “Shakespeare: A Missing Author, Part 1,” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American), Vol. 2/2, p. 13-17.  (reprinted in BTC, Vol. 2: 135-44)  (excerpt reprinted in SON, “Vol. 13/1: 1-6, Spring, 1977; and in BTC, Vol. 6: 112-18) (another excerpt reprinted in SON, Vol. 24/4: 1-7, Summer, 1988)

1941, April          “Shakespeare: A Missing Author, Part 2,” Shakespeare Fellowship Newsletter (American), Vol. 2/3, p. 18-30.  (repr. in BTC, Vol. 2: 144-55)

1949                             “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford.  Introduction by William McFee; afterwords by Charles Wisner Barrell.  New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce.  PR2947 O9 L6 1949

1975                     “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and The Poems of Edward de Vere.  3rd edition.  Ruth Loyd Miller, editor.  Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press for Minos Pub. Co.  PR2947 O9 L6 1975

McFee, William

1949                     Introduction to “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward De Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford by J. Thomas Looney.  New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce.  PR2947 O9 L6 1949

Miller, Ruth Loyd   

1975                     “Shakespeare” Identified in Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and The Poems of Edward de Vere, both by J. Thomas Looney.  3rd ed. Two volumes set; “Oxfordian Vistas” is the title of the second volume.  Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press for Minos Pub. Co.  PR2947 O9 L6 1975

Paul, Christopher

2007, Summer     “A New Letter by J. T. Looney Brought to Light,” Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter, Vol. 43/3, p. 8-9.

2008, June           “Letter to the Editor: re Joan Robinson’s correspondence with and article on J. Thomas Looney,” De Vere Society Newsletter, Vol. 15/2, p. 31-32.

Robinson, Joan V.   

1933, May 12      Shakespeare and Mr. Looney, Cambridge Review, No. 54, p. 14-16.

(reprinted in DVN, Vol. 15/1: 14-16, March 2008)

Wainewright, Ruth M. D.     

1979              “Review of “Shakespeare” Identified and The Poems of Edward de Vere, by J. Thomas Looney, 3rd revised edition edited by Ruth Loyd Miller (1975),” The Bard, Vol. 2/2, p. 75-79.

 

 

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Waugh Presents New Interpretation of Shakespeare Monument at Stratford http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/waugh-presents-new-interpretation-of-shakespeare-monument-at-stratford/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/waugh-presents-new-interpretation-of-shakespeare-monument-at-stratford/#comments Sun, 22 Mar 2015 18:43:28 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6224 Leave it to writer and editor Alexander Waugh to come up with a theory that ties together almost every aspect of the Shakespeare Monument in the Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon. That’s what he has done in his recent article, ‘Thy Stratford Moniment’ – Revisited, a “holistic interpretation.” Mr. Waugh demonstrates, among other things, a connection between the Monument inscription and the lines about Beaumont, Chaucer, and Spenser in the First Folio.

The Monument has long puzzled observers. First, there is the enigmatic inscription – two lines in Latin followed by three couplets in English – all of it suspiciously reminiscent of the style of Ben Jonson, the mastermind behind the prefatory material of the First Folio. A reference to “all that he hath writ” is the only suggestion that the Stratford man might have written anything at all, but the Monument never explicitly connects him to the plays and poems written under the name “William Shakespeare.” Then there are the mysterious changes in the bust of Shakespeare. The bust, as it was sketched in the early 1600s, depicted a man clutching a woolsack (pictured, left). This is nothing like the one on display in the Church today, with quill pen and paper (pictured, right):Monument.then&now

Mr. Waugh’s article first appeared in the U.K. in the De Vere Society Newsletter in October 2014. It has now been republished on the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship website, in a version revised and updated by the author, with the kind permission of our sister organization, the De Vere Society. We hope you’ll find Mr. Waugh’s article, which you can read on our website, as fascinating as we did.

[posted March 22, 2015] ]]>
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Waugaman and Stritmatter confer with Global Hamlet co-founder Nefeli Misuraca in DC http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/waugaman-and-stritmatter-confer-with-global-hamlet-co-founder-nefali-misuraca-in-dc/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/waugaman-and-stritmatter-confer-with-global-hamlet-co-founder-nefali-misuraca-in-dc/#comments Sat, 14 Mar 2015 13:27:41 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=6113 Nefeli Misuraca, PhD co-founder of the Global Hamlet

Nefeli Misuraca, PhD co-founder of The Global Hamlet with Simone Barillari, PhD

 

Oxfordian researcher Richard Waugaman, MD, and Brief Chronicles general editor Roger Stritmatter, PhD, met recently with The Global Hamlet co-founder Nefeli Misuraca, PhD, at the Cosmos Club in Washington, DC to discuss the first crowd-sourced edition of a Shakespeare play.

Lisa McAlister of With Good Cause  is handling public relations for the Global Hamlet in the US. After seeing Waugaman’s work on the Internet, McAlister contacted him on February 17 to ask him to participate in the project.

McAlister said to Waugaman:

I am reaching out to invite you to be part of our [Global Hamlet] community as I think you have some valuable insight and opinions to share. A new global edition of Hamlet will be published in 2016 to coincide with the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. This will be the very first crowdsourced edition of a book anywhere. The Global Hamlet invites people from all over the world to contribute by sharing a quote, making a comment or telling a story of how Hamlet is still so relatable in modern society. Where other collective works become a globalarchive, the Global Hamlet will create a globalauthor. Everyone who contributes will receive recognition by being listed in the book as a contributor.

Waugaman agreed and suggested McAlister contact fellow Oxfordians: Stritmatter and Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship president Tom Regnier, JD. In turn, McAlister suggested DC locals Waugaman and Stritmatter meet with co-founder Misuraca who was in town early in March. Waugaman reported that during their three-hour lunch on March 3, Misuraca told them about the Global Hamlet project and was enthusiastic in her praise for both Waugaman and Stritmatter’s work.

Stritmatter said:

Dr. Misuraca seems like an ideal person to help lead up this exciting new global Shakespeare initiative. She is clearly committed to the ideal of bringing the play to an international audience, not keeping it locked up an academic suitcase as an object of scholarly reverence. She has read at least some of the Oxfordian commentary on it, and seems to me fully aware that Oxfordian scholarship has much to contribute to the comprehension of the work itself and understanding of its place in history. It seems like the Global Hamlet initiative will become a major venue for students and scholars to learn about the play in a less restrictive atmosphere than that promoted by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, the Folger library, and the other institutional forces that seem to be committed to the orthodox view of the bard.

Waugaman and Stritmatter are enthusiastic about the Global Hamlet project, and both plan to participate.

Waugaman said:

. . . this is a wonderful instance of the healthy role of the internet in returning Shake-Speare to those who love his works. For far too long, Shakespeare scholars have held a monopoly on a respectable understanding of who wrote these works. They have tried to act as priests, controlling access to who was allowed to write authoritatively on Shake-Speare. It’s reminiscent of past eras when the laity was forbidden to read the Bible, and translating it so common people could read it was a capital crime.

I was in college during the 1960s, so the ideals of Global Hamlet remind me of the ideals of “Power to the People.” The Stratfordian priests have become corrupted with power, and deserve to be exposed. We need to remember that before the twentieth century there weren’t professional Shakespeare scholars in academia, since only the Greek and Latin classics were taught as literature.

It’s still too soon to know just how I might be involved in Global Hamlet. For starters, I sent Nefeli my review of Bronson Feldman’s book Hamlet Himself. I’m proud of Sigmund Freud’s prominent role as an early Oxfordian, and Feldman was the first psychoanalyst I’m aware of who took up Freud’s suggestion that we re-examine the works of Shake-Speare from a psychoanalytic perspective, based on a more correct understanding of who wrote them.

When contacted to inquire about her meeting with Waugaman and Stritmatter, Misuraca said:

I was very happy to meet professors Waugaman and Stritmatter during my very successful trip to the US. I found an openness of mind and an attention towards what we are trying to accomplish here at The Global Hamlet that reinforced my idea that inclusion is always the best medicine for a stagnant culture.

While we are experiencing an excess of philology in certain areas of studies – an idea that, in the end, every subject matter should be approached via a scientific standpoint – we are also witnessing a true renaissance in independent studies who try to open new avenues of critical thought.

Professors Waugaman and Stritmatter shared with me their experiences and their ideas with a generosity characteristic of those who believe that research means taking many points of view into consideration. I believe that students and people in general all over the world should be introduced to a variety of theory and approaches, so that they can navigate through complex ideas and authors more proficiently.

Shakespeare in particular, with all his complexities and challenges is the perfect medium to start an international and trans-critical dialogue. The Global Hamlet wants to be precisely this: the first in a series of collective classics created by the people, for the people, a platform where everyone can participate under the guidance of expert editors and contribute to the creation of the ultimate Hamlet edition: a snapshot of how this infinite work of art is perceived by the people and influences our times.

Hamlet has created what we now call “the modern man”, it is only fitting that an encyclopedia that wants to produce people’s editions of the major works of the western world would start by annotating, illustrating and also translating this piéce.

. . . Professor Waugaman told me that it would be interesting if we were to participate to each other’s Facebook and Twitter pages. Our community base is rapidly growing (we opened the Facebook page only a couple of months ago) and we are organizing a number of e-events in which your Facebook people could be interested, as well.

Although the Global Hamlet website is currently in beta and won’t be accessible to the public until later this year, anyone who wishes to participate in the project may begin by interacting with editor Damien Peters on one of the project’s social media pages at:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheGlobalHamlet
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheGlobalHamlet
Tumblr: http://theglobalhamlet.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/TheGlobalHamlet/
Global Hamlet website: (projected to open Sept 2015 at http://www.globalhamlet.org)

Global Hamlet co-founder Simone Barillari, PhD

Global Hamlet co-founder Simone Barillari, PhD

The Global Hamlet co-founder Simone Barillari, PhD, clarified the social media initiative as follows:
The collective annotation will start in the next few days on our Facebook page through the guidance of an expert editor. Any and all annotations will transfer on the regular website once it will be up and running. In the meantime, we have already started a collective illustration of Hamlet on our Pinterest account, with users proposing images taken from the vast existing iconography of the play (drawings, photos, stage designs, paintings and sculptures), and contributing them also through Facebook and Twitter. These images will be organized scene by scene and captioned. The idea of launching first on the social media the collective illustration and the collective annotation is aimed to build up a community before the launch of the [web]site.
For more information, contact Global Hamlet public relations director Lisa McAlister at <pr@globalhamlet.org>.

Global Hamlet logo

The Global Hamlet project Q & A with Lisa McAlister

Must all commentators enroll as members and pay a fee? If so, how much is the fee?
No, there is no fee to participate.

Must all readers and/or commentators be members to gain access or is the site open to the public?
The site is open to the public, but if participants would like their name to be included in the credits of the final published book, then they should register as a member on the site. Since that functionality is not yet available we are keeping track of contributors manually at the moment.

Is the Global Hamlet website open to the public?
The site that is currently password protected is a beta site only and the only purpose for going there is to view our concept, not to actually participate. All current annotation activities are taking place on Facebook, Tumblr and Pinterest and the fully interactive site will be launched sometime late summer, probably September [2015].

How can commentators gain access until the website opens?
All activities are on social media and we encourage people to participate on social media.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheGlobalHamlet 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheGlobalHamlet
Tumblr: http://theglobalhamlet.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/TheGlobalHamlet/

Will the Global Hamlet provide training to those who wish to participate?
Although training is not required to participate, the project will offer workshops and conferences to the public. The workshops are suited for any kind of university, school, course, class, as well as libraries and national cultural centers. The conferences are suited for universities, festivals, cultural events and public venues in general.  For more information, contact: <mediamanager@globalhamlet.org> .

Who are the editors who approve commentary? How are they chosen? Are the editors the sole arbiters of content?
Currently we have one editor, Damien Peters. More editors will be selected as the project grows. For example, we are currently working with universities to select graduate students who have a deep knowledge of Shakespeare and an interest in contributing to the project to work as editors. The editors are selected by the project co-founders Dr. Nefeli Misuraca and Simone Barillari. The editors put the content into correct context, but do not determine the “correctness”, so to speak, of annotations as part of the point of the project is to create the ultimate resource on Hamlet with many viewpoints.

Who is the main benefactor or funding source for the project? Who will publish the 2016 edition of The Global Hamlet?
There is not one particular University associated with the project, but we are forming relationships with many universities in order to have a large student population participating. Italian and international private contributors have funded the nonprofit organization — The Global Hamlet, based in Rome –which is behind the project; we have also received an advance from each of the publishing houses we have signed contracts with: Feltrinelli Editore in Italy; Anagrama in Spain and South America; Athenaeum Uitgeverij in Hollande; La Table Ronde, an imprint of Gallimard, in France.

Who is on the Global Hamlet board of directors?
Global Hamlet co-founders Simone Barillari, PhD and Nefeli Misuraca, PhD and Marco Poletto, treasurer of the association, a financial consultant and tax advisor registered in the Italian Board of Advisors

Will the Global Hamlet website continue to be accessible after publication? Will annotation continue?
Yes, definitely (under the supervision of a new team of editors).

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Warren releases third edition of comprehensive index of Oxfordian research http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/warren-releases-third-edition-of-comprehensive-index-of-oxfordian-research/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/warren-releases-third-edition-of-comprehensive-index-of-oxfordian-research/#comments Tue, 24 Feb 2015 15:44:01 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=5726 INDEX TO OXFORDIAN PUBLICATIONS (Cover thumbnail, resized_2)

 

 

 

 

The recently released third edition of James Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications published in hardcopy by William Boyle’s Forever Press is available in paperback, and in an online, searchable database format at Boyle’s Shakespeare Online Authorship Resources (SOAR) catalog.

 

A hardcopy version of James Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications, Third Edition (Forever Press, 2015) is available from Amazon for $39.95 and from the NESOL bookstore for $30. For a $35 NESOL/SOAR membership, readers gain access to the library’s materials not available on the Internet. The library also offers a copy of Warren’s index and a one year subscription to NESOL/SOAR for $55.

Warren is a Sacramento native and retired Foreign Service officer with the U.S. Department of State who lives in Thailand. He published the first edition of his Oxfordian index in 2011, and was honored for his achievement with the Vero Nihil Verius Award for Distinguished Shakespearean Scholarship by the Shakespeare Authorship Research Centre of Concordia University in 2013.

In his introduction to the third edition of his index, Warren said:

This Third Edition includes two thousand new listings (an increase of 50-percent over the 2013 Second Edition), including several new sections that expand the Index’s coverage to practically all Oxfordian publications over the past 95 years. In addition to updating all current Oxfordian periodicals (newsletters and journals) and filling in the gaps where older records had been incomplete before, the Index now includes more than 1,000 articles from 200 non-Oxfordian publications that have reviewed and commented on the Oxfordian theory.

Among these are the regular Oxfordian columns that appeared in Louis Marder’s Shakespeare Newsletter (1979-1991) and Shakespeare Pictorial (1929-1939), as well as others ranging from the Times Literary Supplement, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, Shakespeare Quarterly, and Notes & Queries, to newspapers, magazines and smaller literary reviews from around the world. Not every author listed has been convinced that Edward de Vere wrote Shakespeare’s works, but all have had something substantive to say about the question of his authorship.

The Index has also been expanded to include an extensive bibliography of almost every Oxfordian book published since 1920, along with selected non-Oxfordian books on the Shakespeare authorship question in general. The 350 listings in the new book section include both nonfiction commentary and criticism, and also fictional works inspired by the authorship question. The Index also includes the contents of 22 collections of Oxfordian articles in book form, all cross-referenced with the original publications, and a “J. Thomas Looney Reading List” with details of all of Looney’s Oxfordian writings as well as commentary about them and him by others, in preparation for the important 2020 centennial of the publication of “Shakespeare” Identified.

Since Warren’s Index . . .  is available in hardcopy from William Boyle’s Forever Press imprint, we asked Warren if this monumental work would be made available in an electronic edition with hot links to the materials indexed. Warren said:

Bill Boyle and others working with him are actively at work putting the information in the index into a database that can be viewed and searched online through the Shakespeare Online Authorship Resources (SOAR) catalog, available at the New England Shakespeare Oxford Library (NESOL) website. That database already contains links to thousands of the articles listed in the Index, and will eventually have links to all of them.

William Boyle, librarian/owner of NESOL/SOAR said, “SOAR is the online, digital version of (Jim Warren’s) index. Every single index entry — author, article title, publication title/volume#/issue#/page numbers — is in SOAR as a catalog record, which can be searched in ways you can’t in a printed index, and in which each record will eventually be linked directly to the full text article.”

Warren and Boyle joined forces in 2011 when Warren was looking for a way to distribute his index and Boyle was developing his online resource, the Shakespeare Online Authorship Resources (SOAR) catalog. Boyle said:

The SOAR catalog [founded by Boyle in 2007] is an online catalog of Shakespeare authorship research which had already been embarked on the same mission as Warren’s, i.e. to identify and make available all Oxfordian research in one place, but was proceeding slowly, adding just a few hundred records each year. When I first met Warren via email exchanges over the summer of 2011, Warren shared his progress to date on his index. He had approximately 3,500 entries in Excel and Word formats, far exceeding what was in SOAR at the time; and we agreed to join forces.

I prepared a bound, printed version of Warren’s document for distribution at Concordia University at the premier of Anonymous in Sept. 2011, and several dozen copies were gobbled up in a few days. In the next two years a First Edition (2012) and a Second Edition (2013) of the Index to Oxfordian Publications were published by my Forever Press imprint, and were available for purchase on amazon.com — thus making Warren’s work available to the book-buying public as well as the Oxfordian community. At the same time all the index entries were also being added to the SOAR Catalog. This Third Edition is a milestone, since it now provides Oxfordians, for the first time ever, with a complete history of Oxfordian research as published in Oxfordian and non-Oxfordian publications since 1920, in both a traditional print format, and in an online, searchable format.

Since Jim [Warren] first showed me his Excel spreadsheet for his index in summer 2011 I have been working with him on publishing print editions of the index each of the last three years, and also in using the Excel spreadsheet data as the basis for records in the SOAR catalog. So everything in the 2013 second edition of the index is already in SOAR and can be searched by author, title or key word. Much new material in the third edition will be added soon. There is no paywall to access SOAR, but I do have a suggested SOAR subscription price for anyone who would like me to supply an article — if I have it — that isn’t available online. Anyone can go to my New England Shakespeare Oxford Library website, click on the SOAR catalog link and go to SOAR and use it. And if there is a link to an article online they can click on that [link to access the article].

My arrangement with Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship is that we [SOAR] break out all the individual articles from Shakespeare Matters and the Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter and will have the right to maintain those articles on the New England Shakespeare Oxford Library server as the SOAR Archive — where eventually all the articles in the print index will reside as SOAR catalog records. Each record in SOAR for an article in an SOF publication — approximately. 2,500 entries — has a link to the SOF website pages that list each full issue.

Everything in Jim’s spreadsheet eventually gets loaded into SOAR as a catalog record in the library standard MARC format — a format mostly used for books and journal titles, but which also supports cataloging individual articles. Cataloging individual articles is what is now happening everywhere, from JSTOR to Gale Research, etc. SOAR is the beginnings of an online catalog dedicated to the Shakespeare authorship issue, focused on Oxford. Future plans we are considering include cataloging all the articles available on websites, and all the documents available on sites like Nina Green’s, and more.

Warren says the index project is far from complete:

As comprehensive as the Index is, much work remains to be done. It contains all the Oxfordian articles from the 1920s onwards that I know of, but listings of the contents of many older literary journals in England and the United States likely to contain reviews of Oxfordian books when they first appeared are not available online. And the full texts of many of the older articles listed in the index are not available through any online database that I am aware of. So, while I have in my possession copies of all the Oxfordian publications indexed, the same is not true for all the articles from non-Oxfordian publications.

Shakespeare Online Authorship Resources (SOAR)

SOAR is a catalog of all articles published by Oxfordians and/or by non-Oxfordians about the Oxfordian theory since the 1920s, plus selected material on the authorship debate in general. Catalog records range from in-depth research articles to reviews, news items, conference reports, obituaries, and letters to the editor. SOAR presently has over 5000 catalog records, and by the end of this year will have more than 6500, after everything new in the third edition of James Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications is added. SOAR is the digital version of the Index to Oxfordian Publications, but with more access points, plus there are some records in SOAR that are not in the index, such as web-based articles and digitized documents.

Current catalog records in SOAR for publications of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship (not including articles from 2014, currently available only to Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship members) are:

Shakespeare Oxford Society Newsletter (1965-1995), 747 records
Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter (1996 to date), 967 records
Shakespeare Matters (2001-2013), 733 records
The Oxfordian (1998 to date), 201 records
Brief Chronicles (2009 to date), 51 records

This is a total of of 2,447 records for the newsletters, plus 252 entries for the journals. That leaves 2,500 other records in SOAR that cover The De Vere Society Newsletter, the older Shakespeare Fellowship newsletters (1930s-1950s), The Bard, The Shakespearean Authorship Review, etc. It is these 2,500 other records that we own in hardcopy, but must first be scanned and uploaded to the SOAR archive before a link to them can be added to a catalog record.

SOAR owner Bill Boyle said: “Since the SOF had the most articles overall, and since all these articles were available in the PDF versions of the newsletters on the SOF site, we began with them, after first clearing it with the SOF board [in 2013]. Anyone can search SOAR because it is a public catalog, and anyone can call up a PDF version of an article if there is a link in the catalog record. Until all the older hardcopy is converted to PDF anyone who wants a hard copy would have to ask us to copy it and send it. That is where we ask researches to subscribe to SOAR, to help support our work and to pay for the service.”

Timeline for James Warren’s Index of Oxfordian Publications

2007 Boyle creates Shakespeare Online Authorship Resources (SOAR) catalog  as one of the resources available on his New England Shakespeare Oxford Library (NESOL) website.

2011 Summer, SOAR creator William Boyle and index author James Warren join forces to publish Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications, and to combine Warren’s index files with SOAR online catalog records. Warren’s material includes 3500 records to be added to the 400 plus records already in the SOAR catalog.  (See: Oberon weblog post “Warren creates Index . . .” Sept. 7, 2011.)

2011 September, James Warren takes a limited edition of Index to Oxfordian Publications to authorship conference held at Concordia University, Portland Oregon, to enthusiastic response.

2012 First Edition of James Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications is published by William Boyle’s Forever Press, and made available from Amazon.

2013 Second Edition of James Warren’s Index to Oxfordian Publications is published by William Boyle’s Forever Press and made available from Amazon. (See Boyle’s Everreader weblog announcement of May 9, 2013.)

2013 April, James Warren receives Vero Nihil Verius Award for Distinguished Achievements in the Shakespearean Arts from the Shakespeare Authorship Research Center of Concordia University, Portland OR. (See: Oberon weblog post “SARC conference . . . ” dated March 9, 2013.)

2013 Fall, SOF board agrees to allow SOAR to break down SOF publications into individual article files to be housed and accessed from SOAR (as well as SOF website, if SOF chooses this option in lieu of linking to individual files on SOAR).

2015 January, Warren releases third edition of index with over 2000 new listings. Eighty-percent of articles are linked to online resources through SOAR, with complete links to be made available by the end of the year. Boyle said: “This third edition is a milestone, since it now provides Oxfordians, for the first time ever, with a complete history of Oxfordian research as published in Oxfordian and non-Oxfordian publications since 1920, in both a traditional print format, and in an online, searchable format.” (See Boyle’s Everreader weblog announcement of January 14, 2015.)Links to SF/SOS/SOF publications are available by permission of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship.

Bonus Reading!
Click HERE to read the full text of James Warren’s introduction to the Index of Oxfordian Publications, Third Edition (Forever Press, 2015)

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Editor Alex McNeil releases Winter 2015 Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/editor-alex-mcneil-releases-winter-2015-shakespeare-oxford-newsletter/ http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/editor-alex-mcneil-releases-winter-2015-shakespeare-oxford-newsletter/#comments Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:03:23 +0000 http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/?p=5994 February 23, 2015

The Winter 2015 Issue of the Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter is here! Printed copies will arrive in the mail within the next week or so for 2015 SOF members who subscribed to the printed newsletter as part of their memberships. All 2015 members were sent an email on February 23 containing the password for downloading the newsletter in PDF form from our Newsletter page. If you have renewed or joined for 2015 and did not receive the password, please send an email to newsletter@shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org to get the password.

Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter Winter 2015

Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter Winter 2015

If you have not renewed your membership for 2015, now is a good time to do so. If you want to receive the printed Newsletter as part of your membership, you can still get the Winter issue, hot off the press. See details on our Membership page.

This 32-page issue of the newsletter is filled with interesting news and articles. This issue leads off with Ramon Jiménez’s fascinating article on Shakespeare’s early drafts of Henry V, Taming of the Shrew, and King John, and includes articles on DNA testing of Richard III’s remains, John Shahan’s “take” on the Stratford, Ontario Authorship Appeal, Robert Prechter on the Sonnets dedication, Alexander Waugh vs. Oliver Kamm, a cartoon by John Regnier, news about our conference in September at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival . . . and more.

To give you a taste of what’s in this issue, here is a link to “Shakespeare Full Circle” by Nate Briggs, in which the author discusses the sensation that he has long had “that, year by year, the ‘unedited’ Bard is becoming accessible to fewer and fewer people when these works are staged.”

We hope you enjoy the Winter Issue! Thanks for your support of the SOF and all of its activities.

— The Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship

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